Studi medievali e umanistici, X

X (2012)

Messina, Centro Internazionale di Studi Umanistici, 2012, 324 pp.; 25 cm.
ISSN 2035-3774

INDICE GENERALE

Vincenzo Fera, Petrarca e la poetica dell’incultum
1. Psalmi e altri scritti mei
2. Il ruvido carme di Ennio e di Petrarca
3. Ars poetica dei Salmi
Antonio Rollo, Forme greche e latine nella terminologia retorica di Rutilio e Aquila
Ioannis Deligiannis, The Latin Translation of Prodicus’s Tale of Hercules from Xenophon’s Memorabilia by Sassolo da Prato
DĂĄniel Kiss, Manuscripts of Catullus, Tibullus and Propertius in the Library of the Aragonese Kings in Naples
Alessandro Daneloni, Gli excerpta polizianei da Galeno negli appunti di viaggio del 1491
Michele Feo, Scevola Mariotti e le strade della filologia

TESSERE
V. Mangraviti, Leonzio Pilato copista e ‘filologo’: a proposito di un esametro dell’Odissea marciana
T. MartĂ­nez Manzano, Un nuevo manuscrito del taller de Vespasiano da Bisticci
A. Tramontana, Patria e nomi di Pontico Virunio
A. Di Stefano, Due fossili di elegie del Sannazaro

Indice dei manoscritti e delle fonti d’archivio
Indice dei nomi

 

ABSTRACT

VINCENZO FERA, Petrarca e la poetica dell’incultum
1. Psalmi e altri scritti mei
2. Il ruvido carme di Ennio e di Petrarca
3. Ars poetica dei Salmi
The present study focuses on a specific area of Petrarch’s poetics, that is, the incultum, which is detected in the Psalmi mei septem, whose original title is established here for the first time. This article sheds light on excerpts from several works by Petrarch, from the Rerum Vulgarium Fragmenta to the Africa, and from the Secretum to the Bucolicum Carmen.

ANTONIO ROLLO, Forme greche e latine nella terminologia retorica di Rutilio e Aquila
This paper deals with the morphological features of the rhetorical terms explained in Lupus’ and Aquila’s handbooks, and demonstrates through the analysis of their alterations that their form, handed down in Latin alphabet by the humanistic manuscripts,was originally in Greek. Moreover, it examines the restoring interventions made by a Byzantine hand, identified with Constantinus Lascaris’, in Laur. Strozzi 42.

IOANNIS DELIGIANNIS, The Latin Translation of Prodicus’s Tale of Hercules from Xenophon’s Memorabilia by Sassolo da Prato
The article deals with Sassolo da Prato’s Latin translation of Prodicus’s tale of Hercules as attested in Xenophon’s Mem. 2.1.21-33. The first part discusses the historical and cultural conditions in which the translation was produced, its date, the Greek manuscript probably used for it, and the translator’s acquaintance with Alessandro Gonzaga to whom he dedicated his translation. The second part examines the manuscripts that preserve the translation and their relationships, followed by a critical edition of Sassolo’s dedicatory epistle to Alessandro Gonzaga and the text of the translation. The third section is dedicated to a comparison between Sassolo’s translation and that of cardinal Bessarion, at least for the part covering the tale of Hercules, given in the Appendix; this reveals the Byzantine scholar’s difficulties in vocabulary, grammar, syntax and style, but also Sassolo’s trend to adopt a classical style, namely that of Cicero’s.

DÁNIEL KISS, Manuscripts of Catullus, Tibullus and Propertius in the Library of the Aragonese Kings in Naples
The kings of the Aragonese House of TrastĂĄmara, who ruled over Naples between 1442 and 1501, built up one of the great libraries of the Renaissance. The collection came to be dispersed when the dynasty fell from power, but many of its volumes still survive, and documents such as inventories help us further to reconstruct its holdings. This article tries to identify the manuscripts of the works of Catullus, Tibullus and Propertius that once formed part of the library.

ALESSANDRO DANELONI, Gli excerpta polizianei da Galeno negli appunti di viaggio del 1491
On 7 June 1491, Angelo Poliziano, while staying at Bologna, had the chance to read a manuscript of Galen’s works, which had previously belonged to Lianoro Lianori. From this volume the Italian humanist drew a whole series of excerpts taken in particular from two treatises, the Protrepticus and the Quod animi mores corporis temperamenta sequantur. Nowadays these excerpts can be found in the Codex Clm 807 of the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, ff. 72r-75v. Their importance is undoubtedly great as they represent the only extant testimony of the otherwise lost Lianori’s manuscript (the excerpts of the Protrepticus are particularly relevant since no manuscript of it has survived and we can rely only on the editio princeps of 1525). This paper provides an analytical outline of the issue and includes the complete edition of Poliziano’s Galenian excerpta.

V. MANGRAVITI, Leonzio Pilato copista e ‘filologo’: a proposito di un esametro dell’Odissea marciana
This note sheds light on a passage of Leontius Pilatus’ version of the Odyssey where a lacuna in the Greek text was filled ope ingenii. Leontius made up a new hexameter, whose lexical and syntactical incongruities reveal his weakness as a Greek versifier.

T. MARTÍNEZ MANZANO, Un nuevo manuscrito del taller de Vespasiano da Bisticci
Manuscript 64 of Salamanca University Library has a humanistic content and was elaborated in Vespasiano da Bisticci’s workshop around the middle of the 15th century. It might have belonged to the historian Joan Margarit i Pau.

A. TRAMONTANA, Patria e nomi di Pontico Virunio
This contribution aims at answering the two vexed questions concerning the city of provenience and the real name of Pontico Virunio. For this reason, notarial documents and autograph claims by the humanist are investigated.

A. DI STEFANO, Due fossili di elegie del Sannazaro
The manuscript Vindob. 9477 contains, among Sannazaro’s autograph poems, two brief elegies, that were not published in the 1535 Aldina, but whose verses were in part re-used by the author for other elegiac poems: the first text recalls, through elegiac and bucolic themes, the poet Albino (probably the humanist Giovanni Albino) and his unhappy love for a dura puella; the second one (only a fragment of fourteen verses) is dedicated to Lorenzo de’ Medici. The re-use of some couplets of these texts, with variants, is a significant witness of Sannazaro’s poetics.